Council for the Advancement of Science Writing

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by Zack Peterson | 

They’ve come to be man’s best friend, but Clive D. L. Wynne, professor of psychology at Arizona State University, believes dogs originated from vermin.

“In fact,” added Wynne, speaking at CASW's New Horizons in Science, part of the ScienceWriters2013 meeting in Gainesville, FL, “they may have even qualified as parasites.”

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by Zack Peterson | 

The keys to unlocking some of nature’s most intriguing puzzles about cancer may have been walking beside humans for years.

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by Nathalie McCrate | 

Globe-trotting dust storms on Earth not only carry microbes from continent to continent, they even provide clues to the ability of life to survive on Mars, says an astrobiologist who is an authority on both planets.

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by Elly Ayres | 

Studying how rock weathering in Greenland changed as the ice sheet grew may answer questions about the ice’s long-term stability and the global carbon cycle, according to a University of Florida geology professor.

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by Jesse Mixson | 

Commercial spaceflight may get off the ground with paying passengers as soon as next year.

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by Andrew Kays | 

Throw out your preconceptions about your playful pup's oldest ancestors. They were parasites.

That is what Clive D. L. Wynne, former University of Florida psychology professor and director of the UF Canine Cognition & Behavior Lab, said Nov. 3 in a presentation during CASW's New Horizons in Science, part of the ScienceWriters2013 meeting in Gainesville, Florida.

I don’t feel your pain: Solving the puzzle of subjective measurement

4 Nov 2013 -
4:30pm to 5:30pm
Perception

Nurses everywhere know the drill: “Tell me how bad your pain is on a scale of 1 to 10, where 10 is the worst pain you’ve ever experienced.” Linda Bartoshuk wouldn’t use such a poor question to make decisions about pain medication. Bartoshuk studies the senses, especially taste, and she made her mark with research revealing why the experience of taste varies across individuals. Now she’s trying to fix the way scientists measure perception.

Linda Bartoshuk

Presidential Endowed Professor of community dentistry and behavioral science; director of human research, Center for Smell and Taste
University of Florida

Climate CSI: A geologist reports from Greenland’s melting ice sheet

4 Nov 2013 -
3:00pm to 3:45pm
Paleoclimate

Climate scientists have been watching Greenland with alarm in recent years as its massive glaciers melt, crack and break off, losing ice at a rate that has doubled in the past 10 years. Ellen Martin and her collaborator Jon Martin are spending summers capturing a geochemical record of Greenland’s change, hoping to use this natural laboratory to inform paleoclimate studies. Ellen Martin studies the global carbon cycle by analyzing isotopic signatures of continental weathering.

Ellen E. Martin

professor of paleoceanography and paleoclimatology
University of Florida

LEDs arm a greenhouse "light brigade"

4 Nov 2013 -
1:45pm to 2:30pm
Horticulture and Nutrition
close up of LEDs from a sign

What will the strawberry field, grocery store, florist’s greenhouse and space station of the future have in common? In Kevin Folta’s vision, they’ll all have automatic lighting systems and reflective surfaces that use varying colors of light to fine-tune nutrition, flavor and many other attributes in plants. Since the dawn of photosynthesis, many aspects of the lives of plants have been managed by photoreceptor chemistry.

Kevin M. Folta

associate professor and chair, Department of Horticultural Sciences
University of Florida

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