Council for the Advancement of Science Writing

Perlman fellowships will bring global science writers to San Francisco for 2017 World Conference

United States science writers have started a special individual donation campaign to bring their international colleagues to San Francisco in October 2017 for the 10th World Conference of Science Journalists (WCSJ2017).

The donations will fund WCSJ2017 travel fellowships named for San Francisco Chronicle Science Editor and former CASW President David Perlman, one of America’s most revered science journalists and surely the longest-serving member of the trade. A mentor to generations of science writers, Perlman has been a globetrotting newspaper reporter for nearly 75 years. Considered the dean of American science writing, he has covered the space race, arms control, the origin and rise of AIDS, earthquakes, genetic engineering, medical progress, human evolution—the works—and is still on the job as he nears age 98. Perlman, who served as a CASW officer in the 1970s, was named a CASW Fellow on his retirement from the Council in 2011.

An announcement of the fellowships may be found on the WCSJ2017 website. Instructions for contributing are also available there. Donations may also be made by following instructions on the support page of this website. CASW, a partner in the conference, will accept and manage donations to the fellowships.

Stories about David Perlman's career:

WCSJ2017 will be organized by NASW and CASW and hosted by the University of California campuses at Berkeley and at San Francisco. NASW is the oldest and largest professional science writing organization in the U.S., with more than 2,500 members. CASW is managing donations and sponsorships for the conference and will accept the contributions. CASW is an educational nonprofit dedicated to enhancing the quantity and quality of science news reaching the public. Opportunities for foundations, other non-profits, businesses, and individuals to support the conference can be found on the WCSJ2017.org website.

 

 

Video of 2016 Patrusky Lecture available

 

 

Theoretical physicist Steven Weinberg shared his thoughts about the state of quantum mechanics with science writers attending CASW's 54th New Horizons in Science briefing in San Antonio, Texas on October 30, 2016.

The fourth Patrusky Lecture was a highlight of ScienceWriters2016, the annual conference that combines New Horizons with the professional development workshops organized by the National Association of Science Writers. Some 800 science writers, a record number, attended this year's conference.

A full video recording of Weinberg's talk and the previous Patrusky Lectures is now available on the Patrusky Lectures page.

 

 

WCSJ2017 news: headliners, call for proposals

MANCHESTER, UK (JULY 25, 2016) — African science-development activist Thierry Zomahoun and pioneering U.S. biologist Jennifer Doudna will be among the keynote speakers at the 10th World Conference of Science Journalists (WCSJ2017), to be held in San Francisco, California, Oct. 26-30, 2017, organizers announced today.

In a media briefing at the EuroScience Open Forum (ESOF2016), WCSJ2017 Program Chair Deborah Blum, director of Knight Science Journalism at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, revealed the two headliners and urged science journalists to submit proposals for conference sessions on topics of international concern to science journalists—from climate, environment and infectious disease to media manipulation and access to science.

The WCSJ2017 Program Committee, which includes journalists from Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas, will accept session proposals through Sept. 30.

Ron Winslow, co-chair of the United States-based Organizing Committee, announced that sponsorships covering approximately one-third of the US$2.5 million conference budget have been secured. Johnson & Johnson Innovation has signed on as WCSJ2017’s Diamond Sponsor. Sponsorships will be accepted through August 2017, Winslow said. Winslow is deputy bureau chief for health and science at the Wall Street Journal.

Thierry Zomahoun is president and chief executive officer of the Rwanda-based African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS), which is developing a network of centers offering advanced training and research opportunities to top students in science and mathematics across Africa. Through AIMS’s programs and his public advocacy, Zomahoun hopes to change perceptions about the potential of Africa’s youth and demonstrate the continent’s capability to be a global hub for science.

In 2013, he founded the AIMS Next Einstein Forum, bringing together leading thinkers in science, policy, industry and civil society in Africa to leverage science to solve global challenges. A native of Benin, Zomahoun managed multiple non-governmental organizations before becoming AIMS’s chief executive in 2011.

Jennifer Doudna is a professor of chemistry and of molecular and cellular biology at the University of California, Berkeley. She was thrust into the international spotlight after she and Emanuelle Charpentier, now a professor at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, described their use of a bacterial system of “molecular scissors,” CRISPR-Cas9, to edit a genome.

Research using CRISPR for gene editing immediately took off, spurring patent disputes, the launch of new companies and controversies over the ethical use of the technology. Doudna has been at the forefront of the development of the technology and ethics debates. Elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine and as a Foreign Member of the Royal Society, she is the recipient of a large number of prizes for biomedical research.

“Thierry Zomahoun’s work to accelerate Africa’s development by building a global science hub, and Jennifer Doudna’s breathtaking science and commitment to ethical uses of science, are excellent expressions of our conference theme, ‘Bridging Science and Societies,’” said Blum. “Science journalists play a central role in bringing science to readers worldwide so that they can leverage knowledge for public good and hold their institutions accountable. We are thrilled that these pioneers will be able to join us at the next World Conference.”

San Francisco was chosen as the site of WCSJ2017 in 2015 by the board of the World Federation of Science Journalists, an organization made up of 51 membership associations of science journalists around the world. WFSJ’s members hold a global conference every other year and will meet in the U.S. for the first time in 2017. The conference will be hosted by the National Association of Science Writers (NASW), in partnership with the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing and two host universities, the Berkeley and San Francisco campuses of the University of California.

Among the features of the 2017 conference will be an expanded science program and special training opportunities for students as well as Latin American and Caribbean science journalists. More than 1,200 journalists are expected to immerse themselves in Bay Area science and enjoy events at the university campuses, California Academy of Sciences and Exploratorium as well as a public science event organized by the Bay Area Science Festival.

Fundraising to support conference production as well as speaker and attendee travel is being led by CASW and WFSJ. Winslow said the organizers are recruiting support from foundations, corporations and science and journalism organizations and have received commitments totaling $830,000 to date. Applications for travel fellowships for developing-country journalists will be taken beginning in January 2017, and registration will open in May 2017.

TON and CASW launch "story diagrams" series

Today we’re thrilled to announce a new collaboration that we hope will benefit science writers at all levels of experience, from students to veterans. With support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, CASW and The Open Notebook are partnering to produce a series of annotated stories aimed at shedding light on what makes some of the best science writing so outstanding.

A group of distinguished judges will select stories from among winners of major science-writing awards to be presented as “story diagrams,” or Storygrams. The Storygrams will be featured at TON, along with Q&A interviews with the stories’ authors.

Additionally, they’ll be featured at the soon-to-launch CASW Showcase website, which will republish additional selected award-winning science stories and provide community updates on award programs. Through the Storygrams, both TON and CASW hope to show how tough challenges in science journalism and communication can be surmounted as well as amplify the impact of these exceptional stories.

In the first annotation, coming next week, environmental and science journalist Tom Yulsman, a professor of journalism at the University of Colorado Boulder, dissects science journalist Cally Carswell’s award-winning 2013 High Country News story “The Tree Coroners.” TON and CASW look forward to bringing more Storygrams to the science journalism community soon.

Published May 26, 2016

CASW elects new board members, officers

The Council for the Advancement of Science Writing is pleased to announce that three new members have joined the board, while two continuing board members are rotating into officer slots. Board and officer elections took place during the Council's annual meeting April 30 at the UCSF Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco, Calif.

New directors elected to three-year terms (and pictured left to right) are:

With CASW's program agenda expanding and the World Conference of Science Journalists coming to the US in 2017, the election of new members is intended to restore the volunteer board to full strength after a series of recent retirements. Other members recently elected are:

Members newly elected to officer slots at the April meeting are freelance science writer Robin Lloyd, vice president, and National Public Radio science correspondent Richard Harris, treasurer. They succeed Deborah Blum and Tom Siegfried, who have stepped down as vice president and treasurer, respectively, while continuing on the board. Continuing as officers for 2016-17 are Alan Boyle, president, and Charles Petit, secretary. CASW officers are elected annually.

"We're proud to have these leaders in science writing and philanthropy on our team as we take on new challenges, including next year's World Conference of Science Journalists in San Francisco and other programs we'll be launching in the months ahead," Boyle said. "CASW is now in a good position to build on more than a half-century of improving the quantity and quality of science news reaching the public." 

2018 graduate fellowship applications due by March 18

CASW is now accepting applications for Taylor/Blakeslee University Fellowships for the 2018-19 year.

Underwritten by a grant from The Brinson Foundation, these competitive $5,000 fellowships support professional journalists and students of outstanding ability who are enrolled in graduate-level programs in science writing. They are the only national awards offered specifically to students in U.S. science-writing graduate programs. Since 1996, 91 students have been awarded CASW graduate fellowships.

CASW hopes to notify fellowship winners ahead of April 15, the date accepted students generally must inform graduate programs of their decision to enroll.

Applications may be submitted online through March 19. For details, see this page.

Carlo Croce

Distinguished University Professor and chair, Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics; director, Human Cancer Genetics Program, director, OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center
The Ohio State University

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