New Horizons in Science

presented by
CASW

Green roofs, invading species, citizen scientists: a sustainability field trip

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center offers public gardens of native Texas plants and uses its 279 acres to study how these plants can be incorporated into homeowners’ yards and public and commercial spaces for economic benefit and visual appeal. On Monday afternoon, Oct. 19, New Horizons attendees will visit a research field where the surprising functional variability of manufactured green roofs with native plants is being investigated; learn how citizen scientists trained by center staff use GPS to locate invasive plants statewide for eradication and other efforts; hear about research to save the first plant ever placed on the Endangered Species list; and view prairies exposed to fire to learn the benefits of this natural management tool. Research facilities are primarily outdoors, 20 minutes from main university campus.

Sign up for field trips at ScienceWriters 2009.
 

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The Council for the Advancement of Science Writing is committed to improving the quality and quantity of science news reaching the public. Directed and advised by distinguished journalists and scientists, CASW develops and funds programs that encourage accurate and informative writing about developments in science, technology, medicine and the environment.

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