Council for the Advancement of Science Writing

Knowing the human story key to living with nature, says Johanson

In the second Patrusky Lecture at CASW's New Horizons in Science, paleoanthropologist Donald Johanson traced the sweep of knowledge about the human family tree, insisting that human survival may depend on understanding the journey that brought Homo sapiens into existence.

The lecture, called "The Human Evolutionary Journey" and given on the eve of the 40th anniversary of Johanson's discovery of the fossil hominid Lucy, traced the discoveries that have extended the human family back more than 6 million years. Among these is a recent finding of an Ardipithecus fossil with a divergent great toe in Ethiopia near the Lucy site (photo, left)—one of many finds that may shed light on the paths early hominids took to walking upright.

Many species of the genus Homo are now known to have evolved from prehuman species in Africa, Johanson noted, Don Johanson explains the unusual toe joint found in an Ardipithecus fossiland current work is filling in gaps to explain how modern humans developed their characteristic cognitive complexity, linguistic flexibility and capacity for culture and cooperation.

Johanson (@drdonjohanson, #Lucy40) spoke on Oct. 19, 2014 as part of the 52nd New Horizons in Science briefings in Columbus, Ohio. Don Johanson answers science writers' questions after his presentationCASW President Alan Boyle (above right, with Johanson) presented a crystal sculpture and certificate commemorating the lecture. The speaker was surrounded by writers with questions after the talk.

A video recording of the lecture may be viewed on the PATRUSKY LECTURES PAGE